Yet Another Tips Post on Job Applications

There is so much literature out there already on how to write job applications (namely cover letters and resumes) that I wasn’t sure I was going to write this post, but based on the job applications that I was looking over, I’m almost amazed at how many glaring errors people still make. Continue reading Yet Another Tips Post on Job Applications

Presentation: Making Web Services Accessible for Everyone

This morning , I did another presentation for the Florida Libraries Webinars group. The first time was focused on web content, while this time was focused on overall design and structure. Continue reading Presentation: Making Web Services Accessible for Everyone

A Reflection on Two Years as Content Coordinator

After a little over two years, my time at the BC Libraries Cooperative (the co-op) working on the National Network for Equitable Library Service (NNELS) project will be coming to an end. As I prepare to leave, I thought I would reflect on my work while at the co-op. Continue reading A Reflection on Two Years as Content Coordinator

DAISY Production: A Vision for the Future

Previously, I wrote an overview of accessible production based on how a couple of different organizations produce accessible books. In the future, hopefully production will be simplified as devices are updated to support new standards and some of the standards are finalized. Continue reading DAISY Production: A Vision for the Future

Minor Redesign to the NNELS Website

The last time I really worked on the website, I did not change the look of the site at all, simply using the existing look and making it responsive. After some feedback and based on general good UX practices, I made a couple of mock ups on how to improve the site with some minor changes. Continue reading Minor Redesign to the NNELS Website

A Letter of Thanks

I have often thought that I have been fortunate to meet a lot of great people during my time in library school and since then in the working world. While I have thanked many of them in writing and in person, I wanted to reflect on how the combination of people and their support has gotten me to where I am in my professional life. Continue reading A Letter of Thanks

BCLA Pre-Conference Notes: Why Accessible Library Service Matters in Public Libraries

Disability Awareness Training for Library Staff Summary

Margarete Wiedemann, North Vancouver City Public Library

  • last Canadian census: 1 in 7 Canadians live with a disability
  • public libraries are generally accessible to a degree
  • survey findings: what is helpful: online catalogue, home delivery, plain language,
  • barriers: physical envionrment, time on computer, standing in line, crowded seating, cognitive demands, asking for help and feeling like taking too much time, confusing signage, patronize/impatient/insensitive staff
  • solutions to barriers example: baskets with wheels, walkers for in-library use
  • some of the most difficult barriers with disabilities is people’s attitudes: need to think about what you say and write; person first language
  • Social-Ecological Model of Disability: disability is a difference, arises from interactions between individual and society, and remedy is a change in interactions and context
  • paradigm shift to full citizens with human rights, integrated, included, partipants.
  • communication tips: speak directly and clearly, make eye contact at eye level, show respect and patience, show and tell or walk and talk, ask for help if you are having difficulty understanding
  • universal design: recognize that there is a large diversity, and changes that benefit all users; fix the environment (not the individual)
  • universal design will cover 80+% of users, and cover the rest using inclusive design and individual accommodations
  • library staff can make a difference
  • just make the connetiion and offer what you have
  • an inclusive library begins with you

survey results: AIG section of the BCLA website

NNELS

  • print disability: anyone that cannot read a book in “traditional” print format is considered print disabled
  • tour of the website
  • notes on formats: DAISY have MP3 inside of them, common format, but not one everyone is familiar with
  • resources: nnels.ca/libraries
  • possible engagement: books for student that are non-curriculum material
  • collections highlight awards and other collections including digitized InterLINK reels of BC audiobooks, Truth and Reconciliation (which is public domain and downloadable by anyone)

Discussions

  • devices: bone induction earphones, raspberry pi, slate and stylus, mp3 audio
  • copyright act allows format shifting for print disabled patrons regardless of copyright of the original version

Mike Edwards – Dyslexic Reader

  • made several attempts at universities
  • fear of feeling stupid, etc.
  • post secondary requires psychological examination: something that you had to prove, that you’re disabled
  • what works: have CNIB worker who keeps feeding books on CD
  • accommodations: colour codes text, TextAloud
  • opportunity for outreach: prisons, large percentage of dyslexics

Imagine Living Without Books Part 2: Connecting Print Disabled Readers

In part 1, I asked readers to think about what it would be like to imagine living with access to only a very small selection of books, and provided some additional context for Canada. If you haven’t already, please read Imagine Living Without Books Part 1 as the two parts are meant to be read as one post. Continue reading Imagine Living Without Books Part 2: Connecting Print Disabled Readers